FilterSorb SP3 Advanced Salt-Free Scale Prevention Units

FilterSorb NAC (“Nuclear Assisted Crystallization”) technology is the leading rival of OneFlow TAC (“Template Assisted Crystallization”). The two competing technologies both have many strong points and we have chosen to offer both rather than choose between them. Either FilterSorb, priced below, or OneFlow, will do an excellent job of salt-free scale prevention.

FilterSorb is NSF 61 certified. It adds no chemicals to the water, needs no regeneration, needs no electricity or drain connection. It is trouble free, and the expected media life is three to five years. FilterSorb not only prevents formation of hard water scaling, it also helps to reduce previously formed scale. FilterSorb does not add sodium to water and it does not remove calcium and magnesium from drinking water. It does not alter pH or total dissolved solids of the treated water. (more…)

Rebedding Softeners and Filters

In general, putting new media into a water softener or tank-style filter is like screwing the lid off of a bottle, dumping out the contents, then refilling the bottle. What complicates the procedure is largely that it is a very big bottle and it is often located in an inconvenient place. It doesn’t have to be a hard job, but it can be a messy job.  Here are suggested steps: (more…)

Roundup

Glyphosate, known better as Roundup and sold under several other brand names as well, a product of Monsanto, has been around since 1974.  It is a potent and popular herbicide, registered for use in 130 countries. The world consumes more than 720,000 metric tons annually, so there is plenty to get into water. Glyphosate was detected in 36% of stream samples from 9 Midwestern US states as far back as 2002.

Although Roundup has always been viewed with suspicion, there is little evidence that it poses a cancer risk to humans. Recent studies, however,  have shown mixed results. Currently, the EPA sets its MCL at 700 parts per billion. The World Health Organization concludes that regulatory guidelines are not necessary because it poses  low risk in drinking water.

Despite such assurances, most prefer not drinking Roundup.  There are many options for getting rid of it. These include chlorination, ozonation, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, and filtration with granular activated carbon.

Reference: Water Technology magazine, July, 2016.

The Meaning of “Temporary” and “Permanent” Hardnesspwanniemedium[1]

Gazette Water Wizard Pure Water Annie Explains Why You Have to Watch Out for Temporary Hardness

 

 

 

 

 

What we call hardness in water–the property that causes hard scale to form on appliances and inside pipes and water heaters, spots on dishes, and soap scum–is caused by the presence of calcium and/or magnesium ions in the water. The more calcium and magnesium, the harder the water. The sum of the concentrated calcium and magnesium is often called “total hardness.”

All hardness, however, is not created equal. The hardness that gives you trouble in the home is what is called “temporary” hardness, as opposed to “permanent” hardness. That’s because temporary hardness, also called carbonate or bicarbonate hardness,  breaks down when it’s heated and forms hard scale. Permanent hardness, on the other hand, does not break down when heated and does not cause problems. (more…)

The
The “Light Commecial” Reverse Osmosis Unit

by Gene Franks,  Pure Water Products

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Although small application RO systems, units in the 200 to 400 gallon-per-day range, are not new, they are definitely gaining in popularity. They are especially handy for small businesses that need a limited amount of high quality water. Although they are too small for most water vending or whole house applications, they work great for small private car wash or window washing applications, small restaurants that want great water for drinking, cooking, and making beverages, greenhouses, laboratories, coffee shops, company break rooms and cafeterias, etc. (more…)

 The Pure Water Occasional for July 31, 2016

In this deep summer Occasional, you’ll hear about our decrepit water infrastructure, soaring bottled water sales, flushable wipes that should not be flushed, guacamole-thick muck in Florida water, and mean-assed Stargazers in Virginia. Then there are KDF, TAC, NAC, HABs, OneFlow, FilterSorb, ScaleNet, Nestle, Kingsley Dam, and Soddy-Daisy. Also, arsenic, Siliphos, butyl, polyphosphates, and Spectraguard. Hear about lead testing, cyanobacteria, the most water-stressed cities and the cities with the best-tasting water, our great motorcycle giveaway, a clear RO tank, and,  as always, there is much, much more.

The Pure Water Occasional is a project of Pure Water Products and the Pure Water Gazette.

To read this issue on the Pure Water Gazette’s website,  please go here.  (Recommended! When you read online you get the added advantage of the Gazette’s sidebar feed of the very latest world water news.)

singbetter0515

You’ll sing better.

leakingmainThe Real Costs of the Aging US Infrastructure

How much will it really cost to fix our water problems?

by Louise Musial

Even though water is an essential part of everyday life, residents pay much less for it than cable television or any other utility. The current water rates do not accurately reflect the actual cost of supplying clean, reliable drinking water or wastewater management and discharge to the U.S. population.

In this era of new technologies, a blind eye is often turned to the things that should be addressed. One of the most important of those is the aging water and wastewater treatment infrastructure in the U.S. (more…)

It’s Istanbul Not Constantinople

Just as Constantinople was renamed Istanbul, Watts Water Quality’s star descaling product ScaleNet is being rechristened as OneFlow. The popular TAC medium is being rebranded to share a  name already in use by another branch of the company.

In addition to the name change and a couple of minor alterations in the delivery hardware, the new OneFlow product will be offered at a higher  price.

oneflow

The new OneFlow unit looks exactly like the old ScaleNet unit, except for the decal and the  price tag.

Look for the new ScaleNet (OneFlow) pricing on our main website.  We will also be adding FilterSorb to our website offerings.  FilterSorb is a competing salt-free conditioning system that will be priced lower than the OneFlow units.  Here are the main residential sizes and prices:

Description

GPM Rating

Price

FilterSorb 8 X 44 with 3 liters of Filtersorb.

10

$677.00

FilterSorb 9 X 48 with 4 liters of Filtersorb

12

$884.00

FilterSorb 10 X 54 with 5 liters of Filtersorb

15

$1,075.00

 

kingsleydam1941

Kingsley Dam, 1941 (Click for larger view.)

Gazette Introductory Note: At a time when dams have fallen into disfavor and many of the older dams are now seen as an expensive nuisance to be gotten rid of, the  75-year-old Kingsley Dam stands as an exception. A product of combined private and public funding, the world’s second largest earthen dam continues to provide electricity, entertainment, abundant water for agriculture, and important habitat for animals. –Hardly Waite.

The nation was changing quickly in 1910. Airplanes, radios and vacuum cleaners were new, and the Model T was a hot car. No one had an inkling about big things to come — things like World War I, Prohibition and the Dust Bowl. William Howard Taft was in the White House, and Nebraska still had a two-house Legislature.

It was against that backdrop that Charles McConaughy had his big idea.

(more…)

leakingmainThe Real Costs of the Aging US Infrastructure

How much will it really cost to fix our water problems?

by Louise Musial

Even though water is an essential part of everyday life, residents pay much less for it than cable television or any other utility. The current water rates do not accurately reflect the actual cost of supplying clean, reliable drinking water or wastewater management and discharge to the U.S. population.

In this era of new technologies, a blind eye is often turned to the things that should be addressed. One of the most important of those is the aging water and wastewater treatment infrastructure in the U.S.

Much of the drinking water and wastewater infrastructure with its million miles of pipes beneath streets is nearing the end of its useful life and needs to be replaced. Significant growth in urban areas of the country furthers the need for change.

According to the American Water Works Association (AWWA) study, “Buried No Longer: Confronting America’s Water Infrastructure Challenge,”¹ if the country is to maintain even the current levels of water service, restoring existing water systems and expanding them to serve a growing population will cost at least $1 trillion over the next 25 years. (more…)

Consumer Options for “Softening” Water

Siliphos

Siliphos consists of glass-like polyphosphate silicate spheres that prevent scale and stop corrosion.

There are a variety of strategies used to prevent scale buildup on pipes and fixtures. These are generally lumped together and called “softening” devices, although “softening,” if the meaning is removal of the “hardness” minerals calcium and magnesium, can only be properly applied to the conventional ion exchange water softener or or to reverse osmosis units. Here’s a look at the most popular scale-fighting strategies, starting with the conventional “water softener” itself. (more…)