The Pure Water Occasional for April 30, 2015

In this first of Spring Occasional, you’ll hear Erin Brockovich’s views on fluoridation and the World Health Organization’s views on Roundup. Hear about California’s water war between lawn owners and farmers, meet the bottom-dwelling hatchetfish, and find out how glow-in-the-dark tampons can be used in wastewater management. You’ll hear China’s opinion of new dams in Tibet and the world’s opinion of China’s island-building venture. Learn how milk pollutes water and how sewage can be used to predict obesity rates. Water treatment news about activated carbon, Katalox Light, and our exciting new Aer-Max page. Then there is more (and more) about fracking, the world’s largest single marine reserve, hormone mimickers in wastewater, a new regulation for crypto,  reverse osmosis units provided for poor families, and the pollution of Lake Victoria.  Hear how Yahoo News trashes the strange devices called “alkalizers” (just as ours is still almost ready to hit the market). Visit Hinkley, CA 15 years after Erin Brockovich, find out where Hitler currently resides, and hear the pros and cons of the much-discussed thirsty almond. And, as always, there is much, much more.

The Pure Water Occasional is a project of Pure Water Products and the Pure Water Gazette.

To read this issue on the Pure Water Gazette’s website,  please go here.  (Recommended! When you read online you get the added advantage of the Gazette’s sidebar feed of the very latest world water news.)

You’ll sing better.

 

Let Them Drink Almonds: How California Is Exporting Its Most Precious Commodity, Water, to China

The recent reports underlining the true severity of California’s water shortage brought on by prolonged drought have inspired the state’s lawmakers to consider severe rationing of water to homes and businesses, especially limiting the use of water for home landscaping. While any water saving is laudable and important, an East Bay Express article explains that the state’s real water gluttons, corporate farmers, are seldom mentioned when cutbacks are proposed.  Below is an excerpt from the article.–Hardly Waite. (more…)

Erin Brockovich Speaks Out on Water Fluoridation

After a great deal of research and personal thought, I am opposed to the continued policy and practice of drinking water fluoridation; I believe this harmful practice must be ended immediately. Public drinking water is a basic human right; and its systematic use as a dispensary of a substance for medical purposes is deplorable. (more…)

Can Drinking Alkaline Water Keep You Extra-Hydrated And Disease-Free?

by Molly Shea,  Assistant Editor, Yahoo Health

 Can Trendy Alkaline Water Cure What Ails You?

Gazette Introductory Note:  This piece calmly dismisses the basic assumption of sellers of the products called “alkalizers” or “ionizers”  that the human body needs large amounts of very alkaline water to maintain its health.  The key idea is expressed in the statement that the body does quite well at maintaining water’s pH balance.  It has been doing this for eons without the help of radically treated water or the $2000 machines being sold to produce it.  The fact is that the body must have water at a very specific pH level and it has perfected the way of achieving that level quite without the help of special bottled water or costly electronic gadgets. Truth is, the pH level of the water we drink seems to have no effect at all on the body’s ability to get the pH of the water it uses exactly right.–Hardly Waite.

Water is nature’s perfect beverage. Hydrating, calorie-free, and readily available, the simple drink is as good as it gets for ensuring proper functioning of all your body’s organs. But what if there was a different water, an even more hydrating liquid that goes farther to keep you healthy and thriving?

That’s the premise behind alkaline water, a version of H2O with a pH level higher than 7. (A pH above 7 is considered alkaline, while a pH lower than 7 is acidic — normal water typically has a pH of 7).The thinking is this: Maintaining a bodily pH level of 7.4 is key to optimum health. Because so many foods in the modern diet are considered acidic, drinking water with a higher pH than normal can help your body stay alkaline and disease-free, improving all aspects of health. Proponents call it a better form of hydration, and some drink alkaline water exclusively. (more…)

Why Almond Farmers Aren’t the Water Enemy

by Brad Gleason

 Culling almonds on a California farm.

A quarter-century ago, when I first started farming the fertile ground of western Fresno County, my crop was cotton.

I wasn’t alone. Back then, the San Joaquin Valley had more than 1 million acres of white gold. Federal water cost me — hard to believe today — only $25 an acre-foot. And there was plenty of it. My neighbors and I irrigated inefficiently by sprinkler and furrow.

But I knew then that cotton wasn’t a sustainable crop for California. It could grow almost anywhere, and there was a surplus of it. Plus, cotton growers got a rather considerable payment from the federal government. Those double subsidies — cheap water and price supports — gave cotton growers a black eye. We were portrayed, with some justification, as the greedy farmers of Fresno’s west side. (more…)

 Why God Created the Deep, Deep Ocean, and Where Is Adolf Hitler Today?

Excerpted from The City of God by E. L Doctorow

Have you ever wondered why Nature  created  the “lightless, airless ocean bottom” with its tons of pressure per square inch, its outrageously ugly creatures, its “living tube worms and anglerfish, sea spiders, whipnoses” . . . hanging around in the soundless deep blackness, “their mouths agape and tentacles upheld to catch the flocculent dead matter drifting like snow from the blue and green ocean above?”  Well, according to one of the characters of novelist E. L. Doctorow, it’s all part of a Plan.–Hardly Waite.

 Hatchetfish from the Deep, Deep, Deep Ocean

This is all part of the Universal Plan.

We are instructed that life does not require air or warmth. We are instructed that whatever condition God provides, some sort of creature will invent itself to live in it. There is no fixed morphology for living things. No necessary condition for life. Thousands of unknown plant and animal beings are living in the deepest canyons of the black, cold water and they have their own movies. Their biomass is far in excess of our own sunlit and air-breathing plant and animal life. At the very bottom of the sea are smoking vents of hydrogen sulfide gases in which bacteria are pleased to flourish. And feeding upon these are warty bivalves and viscous, gummy jellies and spiny eels with the amazing ability to fluoresce when they are attacked or need to illuminate their prey. God has a reason for all this. There is one fish, the hatchet, which skulks about in the deep darkness with protuberant eyes on the top of its homed head and the ability to electrically light its anus to blind predators sneaking up behind it. The electric anus, however, is not an innate feature. It comes from a colony of luminescent bacteria that house themselves symbiotically in the fish’s asshole. And there is a Purpose in this as well which we haven’t yet ascertained. But if you believe God’s divine judgment and you countenance reincarnation, then it may be reasonably assumed that a certain bacterium living in the anus of a particularly ancient hatchetfish at the bottom of the ocean is the recycled and fully sentient soul of Adolf Hitler glimmering miserably through the cloacal muck in which he is periodically bathed and nourished.

 

Hatchetfish, Front View. Adolph Hitler Is Visible only from the Other End.

Let Them Drink Almonds: How California Is Exporting Its Most Precious Commodity, Water, to China

The recent reports underlining the true severity of California’s water shortage brought on by prolonged drought have inspired the state’s lawmakers to consider severe rationing of water to homes and businesses, especially limiting the use of water for home landscaping. While any water saving is laudable and important, an East Bay Express article explains that the state’s real water gluttons, corporate farmers, are seldom mentioned when cutbacks are proposed.  Below is an excerpt from the article.–Hardly Waite.

Environmentalists say the proposed regulations fail to address the state’s largest water waster: Big Agribusiness. In fact, California’s agricultural interests use 80 percent of the available water in the state each year (even though they represent just 2 percent of California’s economy). “But there’s no target [reduction] for agricultural use,” noted Tom Stokely, a water policy analyst for the nonprofit California Water Impact Network. Instead, Stokely pointed out that the state is just targeting urban and suburban water users in its rationing plan, even though they only consume about 20 percent of the California’s available water each year.

It’s one of the great illusions in the Golden State. When we think of wasting water, we think of emerald lawns, lush gardens, and backyard swimming pools. And while it’s true that many households and businesses are still wasting lots of water — and we need tougher rules to stop them — the true water wasters are large agricultural interests that are increasingly growing water-intensive crops, particularly almonds, in extremely dry sections of California, including the western San Joaquin Valley (see “California’s Thirsty Almonds,” 2/5/14). (more…)

 

The Pure Water Occasional for March 19, 2015

In this mid-March Occasional, you’ll hear about the Occasional’s new publication schedule (or lack thereof), the staggering reality of global water loss, the toll on women’s health from dirty water and poor sanitation, and Texas communities without running water. Then there are the water woes of Lake Baikal and more water woes for Las Vegas. Hear how Americans stupidly waste one trillion gallons of water per year, what happens to the pollution when snow melts, how the ocean’s weather cycles affect Texas, and how politics spoiled the chance for running water in Vinton, TX.  There’s also news of the Great Barrier Reef, arsenic pollution in South Carolina, and the sad effects of war on the water of East Ukraine.  Learn how overpumping wells causes the ocean to rise, how storms improve air quality, and how road treatment adds sodium to drinking water. Understanding alkalinity, removing nitrates. More, from Newsweek, about fluoride and ADHD, the ominous statement: “California has one year of water left,”  and, as always, there is much, much more.

The Pure Water Occasional is a project of Pure Water Products and the Pure Water Gazette.

To read this issue on the Pure Water Gazette’s website,  please go here.  (Recommended! When you read online you get the added advantage of the Gazette’s sidebar feed of the very latest world water news.)

You’ll sing better.

The Occasional Is Going Back to Being Occasional

by Gene Franks

As its name implies, the Pure Water Occasional was conceived as a now-and-then publication, issued at irregular intervals. It started that way, then for some years it was a monthly, then a bi-monthly, and for the last couple of years it has been a weekly.  Weekly is a hard schedule, since as you may have guessed, Pure Water Products, with its total of eight or nine employees, doesn’t have a big research staff or a stable of writers to crank out newsletters.  In fact, I can truthfully say that while I’m not Charlie, je suis l’Occasionelle. 

I’ve decided that the Occasional can be more effective, more fun, and a lot less wear and tear on me, if it goes back to its original “occasional” schedule.

The plan is to mail new issues as they are ready rather than on the strict Monday night schedule we’ve been following. The plan it also to vary the format and subject matter more.

If you get impatient waiting for a new Occasional, there are about six years worth of old ones to keep you busy. The archive goes back to Sept. 2009 and continues to the present. Check the Occasional’s website for the index of older issues. Newer issues are actually kept on the Pure Water Gazette website, but the Occasional link given above will find them as well.

Thanks for reading.  I really appreciate it.

 

What kills more women than AIDS and breast cancer? Dirty water.

By Maria Caspani

Diseases spread through dirty water and poor sanitation are the fifth biggest killer of women worldwide, causing more deaths than AIDS, diabetes or breast cancer, researchers say.

Nearly 800,000 women die every year because they lack access to safe toilets and clean water, said the development organization WaterAid, which analyzed data from the Seattle-based Institute of Health Metrics research center. (more…)

 

 

Our new AerMax installation kit mounts the air pump on the tank itself. 

The traditional AerMax that we’ve sold for many years now comes with an optional installation kit. With the traditional AerMax unit, the air pump is wall mounted beside the treatment tank.  The new optional installation system, pictured above, allows the air pump to be installeed on top of the tank itself, providing a more compact, vibration-free mounting.  The vertical mount system is now available, as is a timer control that makes installation much easier than previously.  Please call 940 382 2814 for details.

 

Death of the lush, green lawn

by Jim Hightower

Introductory Note:  Unlike High, whom you’ll meet below, I have never been addicted to the lush lawn.  In fact, I take some pride in being way ahead my time in this.  Many years ago, when lawn adoration was virtually a social necessity, watering, mowing, and bagging grass were never among my interests. I have always mowed just enough to keep Code Enforcement from my door. Several years ago our city government started an anti-bagging campaign to save landfill space. They actually gave awards and cash prizes to people who swore off bagging. There was no award for me, who have never in my life bagged a single blade of grass. Nor have I ever received an award for not watering my lawn or for not mowing it, though these save water and energy and reduce pollution. Being ahead of one’s time isn’t easy.–Gene Franks.

My father was an early member of a group now known disparagingly as “ultra-lawn people.”

“High,” as everyone called him, was dedicated, body and soul, to the Sisyphean task of trying to maintain a lawn full of lush St. Augustine grass in hot, dry Texas. He planted, watered, fertilized, watered, mowed, watered, fought bugs and brown patch, watered, re-planted, watered… ad nauseum. Some years he won, in other years, nature rolled him.

High departed his lawn and this Earth well before climate change turned Texas from merely hot & dry into scorched & parched. I know he would’ve denied it at first, but I think even he would’ve finally given in to today’s new reality: In our drought-ravaged Southwest, the lush lawn is dead. Literally and ethically. (more…)

Is Science’s “More Is More” Bias Skewing our Understanding of BPA?

by Gene Franks

A recent Newsweek article (“BPA Is Fine, If You Ignore Most Studies About It”) reveals the telling fact that eleven of eleven chemical industry funded studies on the safety of BPA, the much suspected ingredient of things from plastic water bottles, to tin can liners, to heated copy papers, have found BPA to be perfectly safe, while 109 of 119 studies that had no industry funding (92 percent) found bad effects from BPA.

(more…)