The Pure Water Occasional for April 30, 2016

In this Springtime Occasional, you’ll hear about the St. Francis Dam and the Mosul Dam, residence time and transit time, new Superfund priorities, Chicago’s infrastructure plan, brown tide, and the scary water situation in China. Florida’s Indian River Lagoon, rain barrel issues in Colorado, fluoride in black tea, and a nifty edible bottle from Iceland. Learn the function of Peru’s puquios, the cause of coral bleaching, the joys of phone sales, and how drinking water killed President Harrison. Finally, Pure Water Annie explains pH, we discuss the importance of home water treatment, you get a chance to win a big motorcycle, and, as always, there is much, much more.

The Pure Water Occasional is a project of Pure Water Products and the Pure Water Gazette.

To read this issue on the Pure Water Gazette’s website,  please go here.  (Recommended! When you read online you get the added advantage of the Gazette’s sidebar feed of the very latest world water news.)

singbetter0209

You’ll sing better.

How long does a water molecule stay in a river?

watermolecule

A typical water molecule will stick around in an ocean for, on average, a few thousand years. In rivers, a water molecule won’t dawdle as long — just a couple weeks to several months. But a water molecule hunkered down in groundwater might be around for 10,000 years.

Scientists have a name for how long water molecules remain in any given system: “residence time.” And “transit” or “travel” time is how long it takes for water to get through a system. (more…)

City Water: Take Nothing for Granted

fluidconceptsfilters

The two discolored carbon block cartridges in the photo turned blood red with rust stains and clogged after only two months of service at a home served by a small municipal water supply in Texas. The cartridges are 4.5″ X 20″ carbon blocks that were installed in tandem, so that each got only half of the water flowing into the home. Use was moderate.

The condition of the filters underlines the lesson that we are learning from news from Flint, Michigan and the many other poor water quality stories that are surfacing involving city water systems. The lesson is that city water is not necessarily as safe as we have always assumed–that it isn’t, in fact, being monitored to assure that every drop that comes from the treatment plant is perfect and certainly that every drop that passes through our aging delivery pipes gets to us without contamination.

The logical place to treat water to assure its excellence is at point of entry–where the water enters the home itself. Carbon filtration at point of entry and a high quality drinking water unit under the sink are becoming as common and as necessary as locks on the doors.

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Ultraviolet treatment, once used almost exclusively on unchlorinated wells, is now becoming a common fixture in city homes as “boil water” alerts and disinfection failures become more common.  UV provides a margin of safety even where water is chlorinated.

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Win this Native American Chief Motorcyle

Pure Water Products’ Unique Recycled Contest

To be clear, it’s the contest that’s recycled.  The motorcycle is brand new.

One of our suppliers is giving away this beautiful Native American Chief motorcycle. As beautiful as it is, we  don’t need a big motorcycle, so if we win, we’ll make a random drawing from those who enter our contest and give the motorcycle to the winner. While this may seem like a long shot, by our calculation your chance of winning this motorcycle from us is at least 3,586,334 times better than your chance of winning the Texas lottery. Plus, it’s free.

To enter, just give us your email address. No name or phone number needed–just your email address.

To enter by email, just send your email address to pwp@purewaterproducts.com. Please add the subject line: Motorcycle Contest. Deadline is November 30, 2016.

New Sites Added to the EPA Superfund’s National Priorities List

superfundsite1

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added five and proposed to add eight hazardous waste sites to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). These are sites with known or threatened hazardous waste releases that could pose risks to public health, water quality,  and the environment.

“Cleaning up hazardous waste sites is vitally important to the health of America’s communities,” Mathy Stanislaus, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Land and Emergency Management, said. “Our goal is to give communities the best opportunity for productive use of a site after it is cleaned up.”
(more…)

How long does a water molecule stay in a river?

watermolecule

A typical water molecule will stick around in an ocean for, on average, a few thousand years. In rivers, a water molecule won’t dawdle as long — just a couple weeks to several months. But a water molecule hunkered down in groundwater might be around for 10,000 years.

Scientists have a name for how long water molecules remain in any given system: “residence time.” And “transit” or “travel” time is how long it takes for water to get through a system. (more…)

Gazette Famous Water Pictures: The St. Francis Dam

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The ill-fated St. Francis Dam, shown above, became one of the largest but least discussed man made tragedies in US History when it burst in 1928, killing some 450 people.

The St. Francis Dam was a curved concrete gravity dam, built to create a large regulating and storage reservoir for the City of Los Angeles. The reservoir was an integral part of the city’s Los Angeles Aqueduct water supply infrastructure. It was located in San Francisquito Canyon of the Sierra Pelona Mountains, about 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Downtown Los Angeles, and approximately 10 miles (16 km) north of the present day city of Santa Clarita.

The dam was designed and built between 1924 and 1926 by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, then named the Bureau of Water Works and Supply. The department was under the direction of its General Manager and Chief Engineer, William Mulholland.

At 11:57 PM on March 12, 1928, the dam catastrophically failed, and the resulting flood took the lives of as many as 431 people. The collapse of the St. Francis Dam is considered to be one of the worst American civil engineering disasters of the 20th century and remains the second-greatest loss of life in California’s history, after the1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. The disaster marked the end of Mulholland’s career.

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St. Francis Dam, after the deluge.

Newsweek Video Account

 The Pure Water Occasional for March 28, 2016

In this Easter-time Occasional, you’ll read about Katalox Light, microSieverts, the Pawnee Plunge, Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, and the Gandhi of water. Learn why cats hate water, how much Nestle pays for water is sucks out of federal lands, why ScaleNet is now One Step, and how dairy cows in Saudi Arabia manage to drink California water. Pentair’s new GRO membrane, the world’s hand pump dilemma, vanishing lakes, water scarcity in India, a strange accident at Lake Waco, and the thirstiest fiber. Learn how to remove arsenic from drinking water, hear Pure Water Annie discuss the importance of dissolved oxygen, ponder the possibility that it’s our unwillingness to pay taxes that makes chlorination of our tap water necessary, and, as always, there is much, much more.

The Pure Water Occasional is a project of Pure Water Products and the Pure Water Gazette.

To read this issue on the Pure Water Gazette’s website,  please go here.  (Recommended! When you read online you get the added advantage of the Gazette’s sidebar feed of the very latest world water news.)

 

You’ll sing better.

 singbetter14

Why Do We Have to Have Chlorine in our Municipal Water?  The Answer Is Not as Simple as You Think.

Disinfecting tap water with chlorine is the norm around the world and we’ve been doing it so long in the United States that we accept it as an essential though sometimes unpleasant fact of life.  You may not know that some very advanced countries get along well without chlorinating their water. (more…)

The world’s most expensive places to buy water

By Astrid Zweynert

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Papua New Guinea is the most difficult and expensive place in the world to access clean water, forcing the poor to spend more than half their income on this essential resource, a charity said on Tuesday.

Some 650 million people do not have access to clean water, and often have to make do with much less than the 50 liters per person per day the World Health Organization says is necessary for domestic use and to maintain health and hygiene, Water Aid said. (more…)

  Simple, Inexpensive Aeration System for Treatment of Iron and Hydrogen Sulfide

Pure Water Products offers state-of-the-art AerMax systems with Air Pumps for treatment of iron, manganese and hydrogen sulfide, and we provide a wide variety of parts for these systems on our main website. We also have the simple, inexpensive aeration system described below.

These parts fit and interchange with the Nelsen Corporation’s “Terminator” Aeration Systems. Please call for information and pricing on complete Terminator units.

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In the passive venturi aeration system pictured above, when the well pump is running, water from the well passes through the venturi valve which draws air into the water line. An aeration tank which follows the well’s regular pressure tank provides contact time and mixing space so that the air can oxidize the iron, manganese, or hydrogen sulfide for removal by a filter. (The filter is not shown and is not included in this product. We provide many excellent filters for this purpose on our main website.) The vent valve on top of the aeration tank vents off excess air.

venturiWaterite Venturi Air Injector. Air is drawn into the water stream through the stem on the right. The nut on the left provides an adjustment.

Simple Aeration Supplies

Part Number
Description
Price
AM200 Waterite Air Injector, 1″–3/8 to 16 gpm. Installs on 1″ water line. $59
AM220 Honeywell Air Mix Tank Kit, ¾” $183
AM221 Honeywell Air Mix Tank Kit, 1″ $249
AM222

Honeywell/Braukmann Air Vent, 1/8″. Passive Air Vent without vent tube.

$42
AM223

Vent Tubing Connector for Honeywell Air Vent. Adapts 1/8″ Vent Nipple to 1/4″ tube

$15
AM230 PWP Budget Air Mix Assembly. Include Honeywell Vent Kit, 1″, Waterite Injector, 1″, and 8 X 44 Mix Tank $444
AM229 PWP Budget Air Mix Assembly. Includes Honeywell Vent Kit, 3/4″, Waterite Injector, 1″, and 8 X 44 Mix Tank (Identical to AM230 except that the vent head is for 3/4″ pipe.) $397

This equipment is not yet linked to our shopping cart, but you can order by calling 940 382 3814.

Prices on this page include shipping.

Pure Water Products

940 382 3814

Do We Have to Have Chlorine in our Municipal Water?  The Answer Is Not as Simple as You Think.

Disinfecting tap water with chlorine is the norm around the world and we’ve been doing it so long in the United States that we accept it as an essential though sometimes unpleasant fact of life.  You may not know that some very advanced countries get along well without chlorinating their water.

Although we complain about the taste of chlorine and we’re understood for some time that it certainly has negative health implications, we have been trained to view it as a necessary evil. After all, the chlorination of water virtually wiped out water-borne diseases like Typhoid. The benefits of foregoing chlorine include better-tasting and, potentially, healthier water. But without it, we would go back to the age of cholera, right? (more…)