Gazette’s Famous Water Pictures Series:  The Bendsura Project

The Bendsura Project is now empty. The white line on the dam wall 20 feet up marks the old water line when the reservoir was flush with water just a few years back

The Bendsura Project is now empty. The white line on the dam wall 20 feet up marks the old water line when the reservoir was flush with water just a few years back.

The picture above shows the severity of drought in the Indian state of Maharashtra.

After several years of drought the reservoir that once supplied water to the entire nearby city of Beed is now empty. Half of this western state — 28,000 villages — is battling a severe water shortage.

The reservoir project dates to 1955 when the reservoir was constructed on the small Bindusara (a.k.a. Bendsura) River.

Below is what the Bendsura Project looked like at one time:

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The New Date for National Garden Hose Day Is June 22

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Be advised that National Garden Hose Day, which has been celebrated on August 3 since its inception, has been moved to June 22.  Although event officals did not give a reason for the change, many suspect that it was occasioned by a marked decline in interest for the holiday last year. In fact, one of the event’s coordinators, who wishes to remain anonymous, said that there has always been some concern about the late-summer date.  “By August,” he said, “people are tired of their lawns, tired of their gardens, and tired of garden hoses. It just makes sense to move the date up a bit.”

Watch the Gazette for complete Garden Hose Day coverage in weeks to come.

More about National Garden Hose Day.

PH PARANOIA: UNDERSTANDING ALKALINE WATER CLAIMS

The unique properties of mineral free, ultra-pure drinking water actually makes pH measurement meaningless in the body.

by Jack Barber

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It’s an all-too-common misconception that alkaline water is the key to perfect health even though claims about the health benefits, or safety, of this water are not supported by much credible evidence. Clever marketers rely on personal testimonials and pseudo-scientific studies to promote alkaline water as a powerful antioxidant that can prevent or reverse many degenerative diseases, including cancer and arthritis, boost energy levels and metabolism and slow the aging process. There is absolutely no scientific proof that any of these claims are true.

In the war of the waters, alkaline water zealots not only shamelessly promote the benefits of alkaline water but take shots at both distillation (D) and reverse osmosis (RO). They believe that drinking DRO water is actually harmful because it can be slightly acidic. The truth is the unique properties of mineral free, ultra-pure drinking waters actually make the pH measurement meaningless in the body. It is important to note that de-ionized, rain and many spring waters also have the same properties that make them acidic. (more…)

What People Call Us About

by Gene Franks, Pure Water Products

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When we say phone sales at Pure Water Products, we don’t mean telemarketing or cold calling.  All phone work here is incoming. When the phone rings, we answer it and do our best to help the caller, whether he or she wants to buy something, has a complaint, needs help installing or trouble-shooting a product, or just wants information. The only people we call are people who have asked us to call them.

Phone work is the hardest and scariest part of our business, because when the phone rings it can be anyone with any kind of question or problem. People who answer the phone learn quickly that  you can’t know everything and that when you don’t know the answer to a question the best thing to do is say that you don’t know and offer to get the information and call or email back. We say “I don’t know” a lot.

Here are some of the things we get most questions about– necessarily in order of frequency. (more…)

 The Pure Water Occasional for April 30, 2016

In this Springtime Occasional, you’ll hear about the St. Francis Dam and the Mosul Dam, residence time and transit time, new Superfund priorities, Chicago’s infrastructure plan, brown tide, and the scary water situation in China. Florida’s Indian River Lagoon, rain barrel issues in Colorado, fluoride in black tea, and a nifty edible bottle from Iceland. Learn the function of Peru’s puquios, the cause of coral bleaching, the joys of phone sales, and how drinking water killed President Harrison. Finally, Pure Water Annie explains pH, we discuss the importance of home water treatment, you get a chance to win a big motorcycle, and, as always, there is much, much more.

The Pure Water Occasional is a project of Pure Water Products and the Pure Water Gazette.

To read this issue on the Pure Water Gazette’s website,  please go here.  (Recommended! When you read online you get the added advantage of the Gazette’s sidebar feed of the very latest world water news.)

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You’ll sing better.

How long does a water molecule stay in a river?

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A typical water molecule will stick around in an ocean for, on average, a few thousand years. In rivers, a water molecule won’t dawdle as long — just a couple weeks to several months. But a water molecule hunkered down in groundwater might be around for 10,000 years.

Scientists have a name for how long water molecules remain in any given system: “residence time.” And “transit” or “travel” time is how long it takes for water to get through a system. (more…)

City Water: Take Nothing for Granted

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The two discolored carbon block cartridges in the photo turned blood red with rust stains and clogged after only two months of service at a home served by a small municipal water supply in Texas. The cartridges are 4.5″ X 20″ carbon blocks that were installed in tandem, so that each got only half of the water flowing into the home. Use was moderate.

The condition of the filters underlines the lesson that we are learning from news from Flint, Michigan and the many other poor water quality stories that are surfacing involving city water systems. The lesson is that city water is not necessarily as safe as we have always assumed–that it isn’t, in fact, being monitored to assure that every drop that comes from the treatment plant is perfect and certainly that every drop that passes through our aging delivery pipes gets to us without contamination.

The logical place to treat water to assure its excellence is at point of entry–where the water enters the home itself. Carbon filtration at point of entry and a high quality drinking water unit under the sink are becoming as common and as necessary as locks on the doors.

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Ultraviolet treatment, once used almost exclusively on unchlorinated wells, is now becoming a common fixture in city homes as “boil water” alerts and disinfection failures become more common.  UV provides a margin of safety even where water is chlorinated.

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Win this Native American Chief Motorcyle

Pure Water Products’ Unique Recycled Contest

To be clear, it’s the contest that’s recycled.  The motorcycle is brand new.

One of our suppliers is giving away this beautiful Native American Chief motorcycle. As beautiful as it is, we  don’t need a big motorcycle, so if we win, we’ll make a random drawing from those who enter our contest and give the motorcycle to the winner. While this may seem like a long shot, by our calculation your chance of winning this motorcycle from us is at least 3,586,334 times better than your chance of winning the Texas lottery. Plus, it’s free.

To enter, just give us your email address. No name or phone number needed–just your email address.

To enter by email, just send your email address to pwp@purewaterproducts.com. Please add the subject line: Motorcycle Contest. Deadline is November 30, 2016.

New Sites Added to the EPA Superfund’s National Priorities List

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added five and proposed to add eight hazardous waste sites to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). These are sites with known or threatened hazardous waste releases that could pose risks to public health, water quality,  and the environment.

“Cleaning up hazardous waste sites is vitally important to the health of America’s communities,” Mathy Stanislaus, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Land and Emergency Management, said. “Our goal is to give communities the best opportunity for productive use of a site after it is cleaned up.”
(more…)

How long does a water molecule stay in a river?

watermolecule

A typical water molecule will stick around in an ocean for, on average, a few thousand years. In rivers, a water molecule won’t dawdle as long — just a couple weeks to several months. But a water molecule hunkered down in groundwater might be around for 10,000 years.

Scientists have a name for how long water molecules remain in any given system: “residence time.” And “transit” or “travel” time is how long it takes for water to get through a system. (more…)

Gazette Famous Water Pictures: The St. Francis Dam

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The ill-fated St. Francis Dam, shown above, became one of the largest but least discussed man made tragedies in US History when it burst in 1928, killing some 450 people.

The St. Francis Dam was a curved concrete gravity dam, built to create a large regulating and storage reservoir for the City of Los Angeles. The reservoir was an integral part of the city’s Los Angeles Aqueduct water supply infrastructure. It was located in San Francisquito Canyon of the Sierra Pelona Mountains, about 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Downtown Los Angeles, and approximately 10 miles (16 km) north of the present day city of Santa Clarita.

The dam was designed and built between 1924 and 1926 by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, then named the Bureau of Water Works and Supply. The department was under the direction of its General Manager and Chief Engineer, William Mulholland.

At 11:57 PM on March 12, 1928, the dam catastrophically failed, and the resulting flood took the lives of as many as 431 people. The collapse of the St. Francis Dam is considered to be one of the worst American civil engineering disasters of the 20th century and remains the second-greatest loss of life in California’s history, after the1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. The disaster marked the end of Mulholland’s career.

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St. Francis Dam, after the deluge.

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